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Present Status of Polyunsaturated Fats in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

  • D. Roger Illingworth
  • William E. Connor
Part of the Nutrition and Food Science book series (NFS, volume 3)

Abstract

The hypocholesterolemic action of polyunsaturated vegetable fats as a replacement for animal fat in the diet of both man and experimental animals has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last 25 years1–5. Studies by numerous investigators have shown this effect to be attributable to three main factors: 1) a decrease in saturated fat; 2) a decrease in dietary cholesterol and 3) an increase in polyunsaturated fat particularly linoleic acid. This paper will review briefly the efficacy and mechanisms by which dietary polyunsaturated fats lower blood lipids in man as well as the rationale for current dietary recommendations for the use of polyunsaturated fat for the prevention of coronary heart disease.

Keywords

Plasma Cholesterol Cocoa Butter High Density Lipoprotein Familial Hypercholesterolemia Plasma Cholesterol Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Roger Illingworth
    • 1
  • William E. Connor
    • 1
  1. 1.Divs. of Metabolism and Cardiology — Dept. of MedicineUniversity of Oregon Health Sciences CenterPortlandUSA

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