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Physiological Mechanisms of Conditioned Food Aversion

  • J. Bureš
  • O. Burešová

Abstract

The remarkable properties of conditioned taste aversions (CTA), or of the more general phenomena of conditioned food aversions (CFA) reviewed in other chapters of this volume, have stimulated growing interest in the underlying neural mechanisms. A recent bibliography of CFA (Riley and Baril, 1976) lists 403 articles, about 15% of which are concerned with the physiological analysis of the phenomenon. One-trial acquisition, high reliability, reproducibility, and easy quantification of retention make CFA and particularly CTA well-suited for analytic investigations. Not only is CTA a convenient model for studying short-term and long-term memory, but also it is a special case of neural regulation of food intake. It can be expected that lesion, stimulation, and pharmacological studies, which have predominated up to the present, will soon be supplemented by electrophysiological and neurochemical experiments and that CTA will become an important paradigm for research on neural plasticity.

Keywords

Physiological Psychology Taste Aversion Cortical Spreading Depression Conditioned Taste Aversion Septal Lesion 
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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bureš
    • 1
  • O. Burešová
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PhysiologyCzechoslovak Academy of SciencesPragueCzechoslovakia

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