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Biological Significance of Food Aversion Learning

  • James W. Kalat

Abstract

An appropriate subtitle for this chapter might be “De gustibus (sometimes) est disputandum.” Several years ago, Rozin and Kalat (1971) and Shettleworth (1972) used food aversion learning as the primary example to support the contention that learning is a diverse category including several specialized machanisms, each adapted to particular ecological situations and evolutionary pressures. This position has been somewhat controversial; Revusky, for instance (see Chapter 1), has championed the contrary position, that learning is a single, general process which, like gravity, is more or less the same wherever it occurs, except for parametric perturbations. It is now time to re-examine the issue of whether and to what extent learning involves situation-specific evolutionary adaptations. Even if we cannot yet reach full agreement on an answer, we should be able at least to make a little more sense of the question.

Keywords

Unconditioned Stimulus Physiological Psychology Latent Inhibition Taste Aversion Casein Hydrolysate 
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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Kalat
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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