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Ten Year Survival Patterns in Primary Breast Cancers Compared to Hormone Receptor Antigen Detection by Monoclonal Antibodies

  • Petra Kiene
  • Laura Kinsel
  • John Konrath
  • Geoffrey Greene
  • George Leight
  • Edwin Cox
  • Kenneth S. McCartySr.
  • Kenneth McCartyJr.

Abstract

The prognostic significance of immunocytochemical methods for estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptor analyses was studied in 257 patients with primary breast cancer followed up to ten years. H222 antibody was used for ER and JZB39 used for PgR. ER positive (>10 fmol/mg prot) tumors using ligand assays showed disease free interval (DFI) advantage for 3 years but none after three years. H222 positive tumors were associated with survival advantage throughout the ten year period (p=0.004). PgR (by ligand analysis) advantage was only seen in the first 3.5 years. JZB39 positive tumors showed significant survival advantage through the ten year period (p=0.04). Both ER and PgR correlated with nuclear grade and histologic grade. Within histologic graDe S ER positive DFI advantage was observed only among HG II lesions (p=0.04). While separation within lymph node groups was observed in the initial period in each category, only the 1–3 node positive subgroup had distinct advantage throughout the period of follow-up. The data indicate that semi-quantitative immunocytochemical ER and PgR analyses contributes to the separation of prognostic groups among specific subgroups of primary breast cancer.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Estrogen Receptor Progesterone Receptor Primary Breast Cancer Positive Tumor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petra Kiene
    • 3
  • Laura Kinsel
    • 1
  • John Konrath
    • 2
  • Geoffrey Greene
    • 2
  • George Leight
    • 1
  • Edwin Cox
    • 1
  • Kenneth S. McCartySr.
    • 1
  • Kenneth McCartyJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Duke UniversityDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Abbott LaboratoriesUniv. of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Univ. of HamburgDeutschland

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