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Mechanisms Underlying the Generation of Neuronal Oscillations in Cat Visual Cortex

  • Charles M. Gray
  • Andreas K. Engel
  • Peter König
  • Wolf Singer
Part of the Brain Dynamics book series (BD)

Abstract

Place an electrode on the surface or in the depth of nearly any neuronal structure in the brain of either vertebrates or invertebrates. Record the fluctuations of voltage produced by the flow of current, and what you are likely to observe is an irregular sequence of rhythmic changes of potential having a multitude of frequencies (Bullock and Başar, 1988). If your electrode happens to be within one of many structures responsive to sensory stimuli, the presentation of a stimulus will in many cases evoke a sustained rhythmic fluctuation of potential outlasting the stimulus. This propensity for neural structures to generate oscillatory waves of activity has come to be termed an “induced rhythm”. It is a general property of sensory as well as many other neuronal networks that is expressed during periods of activation. In this chapter we describe some of our recent observations of induced rhythms in the mammalian visual cortex and discuss the evidence for several neuronal mechanisms thought to underlie their generation.

Keywords

Visual Cortex Olfactory Bulb Receptive Field Spike Train Rhythmic Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles M. Gray
  • Andreas K. Engel
  • Peter König
  • Wolf Singer

There are no affiliations available

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