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Signal Functions of Brain Electrical Rhythms and their Modulation by External Electromagnetic Fields

  • W. Ross Adey
Part of the Brain Dynamics book series (BD)

Abstract

In setting a rubric for this volume, Bullock has defined induced brain rhythms as “oscillations caused or modulated by stimuli or state changes that do not directly drive successive cycles.” This perspective offers an opportunity to evaluate two sets of related but inverse problems. There are tonic responses to rhythmic stimuli, responses that extend beyond a brief epoch of rhythmic stimulation. There are also phasic responses to continuing rhythmic stimuli.

Keywords

Static Magnetic Field Pulse Magnetic Field Nonlinear Electrodynamic Radiofrequency Field Rhythmic Stimulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • W. Ross Adey

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