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Hollow-Fiber Separation Devices and Processes

  • Burton A. Zabin
Part of the Biological Separations book series (BIOSEP)

Abstract

As proteins and other biologically active molecules are highly sensitive to phase changes, the process used to separate and concentrate them should not require any harsh treatment that might deactivate the molecule. One such mild method is the hollow-fiber process, a molecular-sieving membrane technique that separates by differences in molecular size and configuration.

Keywords

Fiber Bundle Hollow Fiber Fiber Membrane Triose Phosphate Isomerase Dialysis Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burton A. Zabin
    • 1
  1. 1.Bio-Rad LaboratoriesRichmondUSA

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