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The Function of the Mammalian ras Proteins

  • Alan Hall
  • Jonathan D. H. Morris
  • Brendan Price
  • Alison Lloyd
  • John F. Hancock
  • Sandra Gardener
  • Miles D. Houslay
  • Michael J. O. Wakelam
  • Christopher J. Marshall

Abstract

Single amino acid alterations in one of the three ras proteins have been detected in 25–50% of human cancers and it is believed that the somatic mutational event which generated these amino acid substitutions was an important step in the development of these malignancies (Barbacid, 1986; Bos et al., 1987; Paterson et al., 1987).

Keywords

Inositol Phosphate Intrinsic GTPase Activity Inositol Phosphate Production Bombesin Receptor Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus Promoter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Hall
    • 1
  • Jonathan D. H. Morris
    • 1
  • Brendan Price
    • 1
  • Alison Lloyd
    • 1
  • John F. Hancock
    • 1
  • Sandra Gardener
    • 2
  • Miles D. Houslay
    • 2
  • Michael J. O. Wakelam
    • 2
  • Christopher J. Marshall
    • 1
  1. 1.Chester Beatty LaboratoriesInstitute of Cancer ResearchLondonUK
  2. 2.Molecular Pharmacology Group, Department of BiochemistryUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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