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Toxic Shock Syndrome

  • Arthur L. Reingold

Abstract

Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is an acute, multisystem febrile illness caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The currently accepted criteria for confirming a case of Tss include fever, hypotension, a diffuse erythematous macular rash, subsequent desquamation, evidence of multisystem involvement, and lack of evidence of another likely cause of the illness (Table 1).

Keywords

Staphylococcus Aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Scarlet Fever Surgical Wound Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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12. Suggested Reading

  1. Chesney, P. J., Davis, J. P., Purdy, W. K., Wand, P. J., and Chesney, K. W., Clinical manifestations of the toxic shock syndrome, J. Am. Med. Assoc. 246:741–748 (1981).Google Scholar
  2. Division of Health Sciences Policy, Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Institute of Medicine, Toxic shock syndrome. Assessment of current information and future research needs, National Academy Press (1982).Google Scholar
  3. Fisher,R. F., Goodpasture, H. C., Peterie, J. D., and Voth, D. W., Toxic shock syndrome in menstruating women, Ann. Intern. Med. 94:156–163 (1981).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Toxic Shock Syndrome, Rev. Infect. Dis. 11:(1989).Google Scholar
  5. Stallones, R. A., A review of the epidemiologic studies of toxic shock syndrome, Ann. Intern. Med. 96(Part 2): 917–920 (1982).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur L. Reingold
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical and Environmental Health SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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