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Meningococcal Infections

  • Robert S. Baltimore
  • Harry A. Feldman

Abstract

The meningococcal diseases* represent a spectrum of illness caused by Neisseria meningitidis.Although sporadic endemic cases occur throughout the world, massive, devastating epidemics tend to reflect conditions of crowding, mobilization, and enclosed institutional populations. Such outbreaks tend to be extraordinarily disruptive, especially because of the fear and fright that they induce in the affected populations. Among civilians , children are most often attacked, with mortality rates of 80–90% having been noted in some epidemics that occurred before effective therapeutic agents became available. The disease is also known as “cerebral spinal fever” and “epidemic cerebral spinal meningitis” and by other names. Mobilization for war, with the induction of many young men into crowded military camps, has generally been accompanied by outbreaks. This has been in contrast to the absence of such outbreaks among college freshmen, who also represent a mix from many diverse origins, in dormitories and other sometimes crowded living quarters on many campuses.

Keywords

Meningococcal Disease Carrier Rate Neisseria Meningitidis Secondary Case Meningococcal Meningitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert S. Baltimore
    • 1
  • Harry A. Feldman
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Public HealthYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of Preventive MedicineState University of New York, Upstate Medical CenterSyracuseUSA

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