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Survey Drafting

  • Edward G. Zimmerman

Abstract

A sketch, map, or graphic display is often the only visible product of a surveyor’s work. Therefore, the importance of presenting the client with a nice-appearing, professionally done graphic product cannot be overemphasized. Attractiveness, accuracy of plot, legibility, and clearly imparted information are vital in creating a survey drafting product worthy of professional respect.

Keywords

Contour Line Contour Interval Plane Coordinate System Finished Drawing Field Book 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. American Society of Civil Engineers. 1983. Map uses, scales and accuracies for engineering and associated purposes. Report of the ASCE Surveying and Mapping Division Committee on Cartographic Surveying. New York: ASCE.Google Scholar
  2. American Society of Civil Engineers. 1972. Selection of maps for engineering and planning. Task committee for preparation of a manual on selection of map types, scales, and accuracies for engineering and planning. Journal of the Surveying and Mapping Division, ASCE, No. SUI.Google Scholar
  3. Brinker, R. C., and P. R. Wolf. 1984. Elementary surveying. 7th ed. New York: Harper amp; Row.Google Scholar
  4. Moffit, F. H., and H. Bouchard. 1984. Surveying. 7th ed. New York: Harper amp; Row.Google Scholar
  5. Davis, R. E., F. S. Foote, J. M. Anderson, and E. M. Mikhail. 1983. Surveying—theory and practice. 6th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  6. Sloane, R. C., and J. M. Montz. 1943. Elements of topographic drawing. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward G. Zimmerman

There are no affiliations available

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