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Metabolism and Energetics of Vascular Smooth Muscle

  • John W. Peterson
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 34)

Abstract

The metabolism and energetics of vascular smooth muscle contractility have been comprehensively reviewed in the past several years {1–8}. This short review attempts therefore only to summarize briefly what is rather widely accepted regarding the energy metabolism of vascular smooth muscle and the demands imposed upon that metabolism by contractile activity. In the latter part, I try to focus on several issues which are currently unresolved and topics of some debate.

Keywords

Vascular Smooth Muscle Isometric Force Aerobic Glycolysis Isometric Tension Mammalian Skeletal Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Peterson

There are no affiliations available

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