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Specific Language and Learning Disorders

  • Lorian Baker
  • Dennis P. Cantwell

Abstract

Most professionals who work with children acknowledge the existence of a class of disorders of development that are characterized by: (1) the inadequate development of particular skills (involving language and/or academic learning) and (2) the absence of any demonstrable etiology of physical disorder, neurological disorder, global mental retardation, or severe environmental deprivation. This group of disorders has been labeled “minimal brain dysfunction syndrome” by the National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults (Clements, 1966a) and the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness (Clements, 1968b); “special learning disabilities” by the National Advisory Committee on Handicapped Children (1968); “specific learning disabilities” by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (Chalfant & Scheffelin, 1969), the U.S. Office of Education (1977), and the Council for Exceptional Children (U.S. Public Law 94–142; 1975); “developmental disorders” by the World Health Organization (WHO, 1978, 1986); “specific developmental disorders” by the American Psychiatric Association (APA, 1980, 1987); and “learning disabilities” by the National Joint Committee for Learning Disabilities (Hammill, Leigh, McNutt, & Larsen, 1981).

Keywords

Specific Language Learn Disability Language Disorder Communication Disorder Recurrent Otitis Medium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorian Baker
    • 1
  • Dennis P. Cantwell
    • 1
  1. 1.UCLA Neuropsychiatric InstituteLos AngelesUSA

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