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Psychopharmacological Treatment

  • Magda Campbell
  • Richard Perry
  • Ira L. Cohen
  • Arthur M. Small

Abstract

Pharmacotherapy, at the present state of our knowledge, is viewed only as an adjunct to psychosocial and other treatments in certain disturbed children. It has been said that, even in adults, the only lasting effect of a drug is indirect: that is, it is a result of the changed interaction between the patient and his or her environment due to concurrent psychosocial treatment(s) (Irwin, 1968). The nondrug treatments in children include individual psychotherapy, behavior modification, remedial work, and parental counseling. It is expected that a therapeutically effective drug will make the disturbed child more amenable to these treatments, or that it will enhance (interact with) them.

Keywords

Tardive Dyskinesia Autistic Child Tourette Syndrome Child Psychiatry Attention Deficit Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magda Campbell
    • 1
  • Richard Perry
    • 1
  • Ira L. Cohen
    • 2
  • Arthur M. Small
    • 3
  1. 1.Children’s Psychopharmacology Unit and Department of PsychiatryNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Autism Project, Department of PsychologyNew York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental DisabilitiesStaten IslandUSA
  3. 3.Children’s Psychopharmacology UnitNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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