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Childhood Cancer

  • Michael J. Dolgin
  • Susan M. Jay

Abstract

Pediatric oncology is a field in which psychological research and intervention have evolved in parallel with changing medical realities and demands. Advances in biomedical technology since the 1960s and an improved prognosis for a large proportion of children with cancer have shifted the psychosocial focus from death and bereavement to an increasing emphasis on coping with aggressive treatment regimens, adaptation and return to routine functioning, and survivorship (Kellerman, 1980; Koocher & O’Malley, 1981; Varni & Katz, 1987). In addition to a deeper understanding of the range of psychological issues facing children with cancer and their families, the linking of behavioral and medical sciences has resulted in more sophisticated behavioral research techniques and specific treatment approaches that can be applied to other chronically ill populations. In this sense, pediatric oncology serves as a model area for the practice of pediatric psychology and behavioral medicine.

Keywords

Behavioral Medicine Childhood Cancer Pediatric Oncology Psychological Aspect Pediatric Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Dolgin
    • 1
  • Susan M. Jay
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children’s Hospital of Los AngelesUniversity of Southern California, School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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