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Enuresis and Encopresis

  • Daniel M. Doleys

Abstract

The first portion of this chapter features a description of childhood enuresis. It is in many ways a very different and interesting disorder. It is one in which the child and family in general quietly suffer through the problem. Parents often hesitate even to bring it to the attention of their doctor. The embarrassment to the child and the family seems to be a primary factor. There is a tendency to attribute it to poor parenting or to some significant psychopathology in the child. For these and other reasons, treatment is postponed, often indefinitely, in the hopes that the enuresis will resolve. “Home remedies” abound.

Keywords

Fecal Incontinence Anal Sphincter Bowel Movement Internal Anal Sphincter Bladder Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel M. Doleys
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavioral Medicine ServicesBrookwood Medical CenterBirminghamUSA

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