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Treponematoses Other Than Syphilis

  • Rudolph H. Kampmeier

Abstract

The several diseases discussed in this chapter are endemic among primitive peoples in certain geographic areas of the world and are referred to as the “endemic treponematoses”. They are considered as a group because they are acquired in childhood, have a pattern of “herd infection”, are characterized by cutaneous manifestations, and in some instances produce destructive late sequelae. They are especially intriguing in that they are caused by treponemes that cannot be distinguished morphologically from those of syphilis, give positive reactions in serological tests for syphilis (STSs), and respond to antisvphilitic treatment.

Keywords

Cutaneous Manifestation Scientific Group Mass Treatment Congenital Syphilis Herd Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Hackett, C. J. An international nomenclature of yaws lesions, WHO Monogr. Ser., No. 36, (1957).Google Scholar
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  3. Hudson, E. H., Treponematoses, in: Oxford Loose-Leaf Medicine (H. Christian, ed.) p. 656, Oxford University Press, New York, 1946.Google Scholar
  4. Hudson, E. H. Nonveneral syphilis: A sociological and medical study of Bejel, E. and S. Livingstone, London, 1958.Google Scholar
  5. Turner, T. B., and Hollander, D. W., Biology of the Treponematosis, Who Monogr. Ser., No. 35, 1957.Google Scholar
  6. WHO, Report of a Scientific Group, Treponematosis Research, WHO Tech. Rep. Ser., No. 455, 1970.Google Scholar
  7. WHO, Endemic treponematoses of childhood, WHO Chron. 18:403–417 (1964).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rudolph H. Kampmeier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, EmeritusVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA

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