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Streptococcal Infections

  • Robert W. Quinn

Abstract

Streptococcal diseases of man have occurred for millenia, but it was not until the 19th century that the association between the etiological agent and the various clinical forms of the disease was learned. The principal forms of streptococcal disease now recognized are streptococcal sore throat, scarlet fever, streptococcal skin infection (impetigo, or pyoderma, and erysipelas). Streptococci may also cause suppurative infections (abscesses, pneumonia), food poisoning, and systemic disease (septicemia, endocarditis). Of significant clinical and public-health importance are the nonsuppurative sequelae of streptococcal disease, namely, rheumatic fever and acute glomerulonephritis.

Keywords

Hyaluronic Acid Rheumatic Fever Rheumatic Heart Disease Streptococcal Infection Acute Rheumatic Fever 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert W. Quinn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Preventive MedicineVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA

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