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Abstract

Shigellosis, an acute infectious enteritis of humans and on occasion subhuman primates, is still often referred to as bacillary dysentery. The reason is that dysentery, a syndrome manifested by frequent passage of small-volume, bloody mucoid stools, abdominal cramps, and tenesmus, is widely considered to be the principal clinical presentation of the infection. However, this is not true—watery diarrhea without blood or mucus is much more common.(28) In addition, there are a myriad of manifestations described in shigellosis, some common and some rare, that without doubt qualify the organism as a protean pathogen.(4,61). The objective of this chapter is to present the salient features of shigellosis in sufficient detail to understand the spectrum of the disease and its distinctive epidemiology.

Keywords

Diarrheal Disease Enteric Pathogen Watery Diarrhea Shigella Dysenteriae Secretory Diarrhea 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald T. Keusch
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Geographic MedicineTufts University School of MedicineBostonUSA

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