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Pertussis

  • Edward A. MortimerJr.

Abstract

Bordetella pertussis produces a single disease syndrome in man known as pertussis or whooping cough. Affecting children primarily, it characteristically displays a protracted course measured in weeks with the development of vigorous paroxysmal coughing, often associated with vomiting that sometimes results in inanition, and occasionally with anoxic brain damage. At the turn of the century, it was a major cause of infant mortality worldwide; it remains an important cause of infant mortality in many parts of the underdeveloped world, but, probably in part due to immunization, it is at present of less consequence in developed countries such as the United States.

Keywords

Young Infant Pertussis Vaccine Bordetella Pertussis Whooping Cough Clinical Immunity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward A. MortimerJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Community HealthCase Western Reserve University School of MedicineClevelandUSA

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