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Gonococcal Infections

  • Paul J. Wiesner
  • Sumner E. ThompsonIII

Abstract

Gonococcal infections have plagued humankind for centuries. The epidemiology of gonococcal infections is related to complex and changing behaviors of the human host and the infecting agent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The term gonorrhea, meaning “a flow of seed,” originally referred to the urethral discharge of men with acute urethritis. We prefer the term gonococcal infection, which encompasses all the various primary infections and the complications caused by N. gonorrhoeae. The gonococcus infects columnar and transitional epithelium of human surfaces (eye, oropharynx, respiratory tract, anal canal, uterine cervix, urethra). Serious complications arise when the gonococcus spreads within tubal structures or invades the bloodstream.

Keywords

Sexual Partner Anal Canal Ectopic Pregnancy Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Neisseria Gonorrhoeae 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul J. Wiesner
    • 1
  • Sumner E. ThompsonIII
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Venereal Disease Control DivisionCenters for Disease ControlAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Infectious DiseasesEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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