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Cholera

  • Abram S. Benenson

Abstract

Cholera is an acute epidemic dehydrating diarrhea, usually sudden in onset and, if not properly treated, fatal in as man as half thôse affected. While a similar clinica entity can e cause y ot er agents, the term is usually reserved for all diarrheal illnesses caused by Vibrio cholerae, and expanded to include those with only a few loose bowel movements.

Keywords

Secondary Case Vibrio Cholerae Cholerae Strain Cholera Vibrio Cholera Case 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abram S. Benenson
    • 1
  1. 1.Gorgas Memorial LaboratoryGorgas Memorial Institute of Tropical and Preventive Medicine, Inc.Panama

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