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Transitions in Solid Polymers

  • Shogo Saito
Part of the Treatise on Solid State Chemistry book series (TSSC, volume 5)

Abstract

The simplest molecules, for instance, rare gas molecules, crystallize under suitable conditions. These simplest substances can exist in the gas, liquid, or solid phase. Diatomic or polyatomic molecules also crystallize and can exist in any of the three phases as long as the molecules are not very large. The shape of the polyatomic molecules, however, is different from that of the rare gas molecules, which have spherical symmetry. The intermolecular interaction in the polyatomic molecules is anisotropic.

Keywords

Glass Transition Free Volume Molecular Motion Solid Polymer Torsional Oscillation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shogo Saito
    • 1
  1. 1.Materials Division, Electrotechnical LaboratoryAgency of Industrial Science and TechnologyJapan

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