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Dose-Response Relation of Chromosome Aberrations

  • J. D. Jansen

Abstract

First of all I want to make clear that I am not a geneticist and even less a cytogeneticist. There are many people here who know far more than I do about the subject. I can only give the view and experience of a very interested scientific outsider. However, much of my time has been spent in trying to determine the human relevance of chromosome aberrations and in trying to ensure the protection of human health in manufacturing plants.

Keywords

Chromosome Aberration Ankylose Spondylitis Patient Bilateral Retinoblastoma Exchange Aberration Ideal Control Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Jansen
    • 1
  1. 1.Group ToxicologySIRM B.V.The HagueNetherlands

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