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The Mutagen Sensitivity Response of Cells from Individuals Heterozygous for DNA Repair Deficiency Genes

  • Colin F. Arlett
  • Susan A. Harcourt

Abstract

A number of rare, recessive human syndromes have been described as both cancer prone and to exhibit defects in the repair of DNA damage. These include xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi’s anaemia (FA) and Bloom’s syndrome (BS) [1].

Keywords

Cell Strain Xeroderma Pigmentosum Complementation Group Obligate Heterozygote Spouse Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin F. Arlett
    • 1
  • Susan A. Harcourt
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Cell Mutation UnitUniversity of SussexFalmer, BrightonEngland

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