• Edward K. Yeargers
  • Ronald W. Shonkwiler
  • James V. Herod


In this chapter we will study the ways that genetic information is passed between generations and how it is expressed. Cells can make exact copies of themselves through asexual reproduction. The genes such cells carry can be turned off and on to vary the cells’ behaviors, but the basic information they contain can be changed only by mutation, a process that is somewhat rare to begin with and usually kills the cell anyway.


Sexual Reproduction Daughter Cell Probability Generate Function Homologous Pair Beneficial Mutation 


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References and Suggested Further Reading

  1. 1.
    Cell division and reproduction: William S. Beck, Karel F. Liem and George Gaylord Simpson, Life — An Introduction To Biology, 3rd ed., Harper-Collins Publishers, New York, 1991.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Genetics: David T. Suzuki, Anthony J. F. Griffiths, Jeffrey H. Miller and Richard C. Lewontin, An Introduction to Genetic Analysis, W.H. Freeman and Co. New York. 3rd ed. 1986.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sexual selection in humans: David M. Buss, “The Strategies of Human Mating,” American Scientist, vol. 82, May—June. Dp. 238–249. 1994.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mathematical genetics: J. F. Crow, M. Kimura, “An introduction to population genetics theory,” Harper & Row, New York. 1970.MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Mathematical genetics: J. B. S. Haldane, “A Mathematical Theory of Natural and Artificial Selection, Part V, Selection and Mutation,” Camb. Philos. Soc. Proc. 23, Pt VII, 838–844, 1927.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward K. Yeargers
    • 1
  • Ronald W. Shonkwiler
    • 2
  • James V. Herod
    • 2
  1. 1.School of BiologyGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.School of MathematicsGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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