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Production of Maleic Anhydride

  • B. C. Trivedi
  • B. M. Culbertson

Abstract

The first commercial process for MA production was put into use by National Aniline and Chemical in 1928.* It used the Weiss and Downs process employing benzene as a raw material.(1) In 1930, Monsanto made available MA which was a by-product of their phthalic anhydride manufacture. Petrotex also used their butene-based process in the early 1960s, which was later abandoned in favor of a benzene-based process in 1967. Benzene is still the most popular feed today. Reportedly 90% of world capacity for MA uses benzene.(2) Even when benzene was a coal-derived chemical, it was abundant. With the development of the petrochemical industry, benzene was available in larger quantities at lower prices. As a result it became a more attractive raw material. However, the petrochemical industry has in recent years made C4 hydrocarbons available. There is stoichiometric advantage in using C4 hydrocarbons over benzene since in the latter two carbons or one-third of the molecule is wasted. Thus, ideally 100 lb of benzene would yield 125.6 lb of MA whereas 100 lb of butane would give 168.9 lb of MA. This intrinsic advantage of C4-hydrocarbon-based raw material has shown greater activity for MA production in recent years.

Keywords

Maleic Acid Maleic Anhydride Fumaric Acid Vanadium Oxide Phthalic Anhydride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. C. Trivedi
    • 1
  • B. M. Culbertson
    • 1
  1. 1.Ashland Chemical CompanyDublinUSA

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