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Introduction

  • B. C. Trivedi
  • B. M. Culbertson

Abstract

Maleic anhydride (MA)* was first produced some 150 years ago by dehydration of maleic acid. Today, it is a chemical of considerable commercial importance. Next to acetic and phthalic anhydride, it is the second most important anhydride in commercial use.

Keywords

Maleic Acid Maleic Anhydride Maleic Anhydride Fumaric Acid Polyester Resin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. C. Trivedi
    • 1
  • B. M. Culbertson
    • 1
  1. 1.Ashland Chemical CompanyDublinUSA

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