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Kinins—II pp 51-55 | Cite as

Kininogenase Activity and Kinin-Like Substance in the Venomous Spicules and Spines of Lepidopteran Larvae

  • F. Kawamoto
  • N. Kumada
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

Of the medically important caterpillars of Lepidopteran insects (moths and butterflies) in Japan, some species of the genus Euproctis (tussock moth) and three kinds of slug moths, Parasa consocia, Parasa sinica, Cnidocampa flavescens, are known to be the most harmful. Recently, the pioneer work was performed by de Jong and Bleumink (1–2) concerning the spicule venom of the brown tail moth, E. chrysorrhoea, and they found the presence of enzymic activities of protease, esterase and phospholipase A2 in its extract. However, there is little knowledge about the nature of the venoms involved in the venomous spicules and spines of the above insects.

Keywords

Lepidopteran Insect Crude Venom Lepidopteran Larva Lower Molecular Fraction Tussock Moth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    de Jong, M.C.J.M. and E. Bleumink (1977): Investigative studies of the dermatitis caused by the larvae of the Brown-tail moth, Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn.(Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae) III. Chemical analysis of skin reactive substances. Arch. Derm. Res., 259, 247–262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    de Jong, M.C.J.M. and E. Bleumink (1977): Investigative studies of the dermatitis caused by the larvae of the Brown-tail moth, Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn.(Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae) IV. Further characterization of skin reactive substances. Arch. Derm. Res., 259, 263–281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kawamoto, F., C. Suto and N. Kumada (1978): Studies on the venomous spicules and spines of moth caterpillars I. Fine structure and development of the venomous spicules of the Euproctis caterpillars. Jap. J. Med. Sci. Biol., 31, 291–299.Google Scholar
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    Kawamoto, F. (1978): Studies on the venomous spicules and spines of moth caterpillars II. Pharmacological andbiochemical properties of the spicule venom of the Oriental tussock moth caterpillar, Euproctis subflava. Jap. J. Sanft. Zool., 29, 175–183.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kawamoto, F. (1978): Studies on the venomous spicules and spines of moth caterpillars III. Scanning electron microscopic examination of spines and spicules of the slug moth caterpillar, Parasa consocia, and some properties of pain-producing substances in their venoms. Jap. J. Sanit. Zool., 29, 185–196.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Pisano, J.J. (1968): Vasoactive peptides in venoms. Fed. Proc., 27, 58–62.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Kawamoto
    • 1
  • N. Kumada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical ZoologyNagoya University School of MedicineShowa, Nagoya 466Japan

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