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Intervalley Electron-Phonon and Hole-Phonon Interactions in Semiconductors: Experiment and Theory

  • Fred H. Pollak
  • Orest J. Glembocki

Abstract

Intervalley electron-phonon (EP) and hole-phonon(HP) interactions play an important role in many optical1–5, time-dependent optical6, and transport7–10 properties of semiconductors. However, relatively little is known about them either experimentally or theoretically. This deficiency can be traced to the difficulty in obtaining reliable experimental values for the matrix elements of these interactions. In multivalley indirect semiconductors the fundamental absorption process is phonon-assisted. This process can proceed by two mechanisms involving EP as well as HP scattering matrix elements and in such a way that they can interfere either constructively or destructively. However, the nature of this interference phenomena inhibits the evaluate of these matrix elements directly by measuring only one parameter, e.g. the absorption coefficient or luminescence. This difficulty can be overcome by the application of a uniaxial stress along appropriate crystallographic axes which reduces the symmetry of the valence and/ or conduction bands. We will discuss various piezospectroscopic experiments that have been performed on Si (Γ-Δ),3 GaP(Γ-X)1,11 and Ge (Γ-L)4. These studies, combined with previously measured values of the absorption coefficient, can be used to evaluate the EP and HP scattering matrix elements for the TO phonon in Si2 as well as the LA and TA phonons in GaP2,11.

Keywords

Matrix Element Form Factor Oscillator Strength Uniaxial Stress Theoretical Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred H. Pollak
    • 1
    • 2
  • Orest J. Glembocki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsBrooklyn College of The City University of New YorkBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.Physics Dept.Graduate School and University Center of CUNYNew YorkUSA

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