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Defining and Measuring Perceptual-Motor Workload in Manual Control Tasks

  • Henry R. Jex
  • Warren F. Clement
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 8)

Abstract

“Everyone knows” when he is subjected to a high mental workload or stress in a complex manual control task such as driving a car, steering a ship, or flying an airplane. Nevertheless, there is, as yet, no accepted definition of operator workload. This is mainly due to the incommensurate dimensions of various loading tasks and the lack of any comprehensive theory or validated models.

Keywords

Manual Control Primary Task Secondary Task Tracking Task Breathing Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry R. Jex
    • 1
  • Warren F. Clement
    • 1
  1. 1.Systems Technology, Inc.HawthorneUSA

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