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General Concepts of Waste Utilization for the Production of Microbial Biomass and Bio-Energy

  • B. Pekin
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 67)

Abstract

Some agricultural products obtained from plants and animals are nutritionally valuable foods for men and animals. It has been known for a long time that microbial spoilage of food materials cause the formation of some toxic substances as well as the formation of undesirable tastes and odours in foods. On the other hand, some types of microbial spoilage of foodstuff are accepted. For example, the growth of molds in some cheeses ensure the flavour and are accepted. Growth of some microbes in food materials can also increase their nutritional value. For example, some fermented foods such as cheeses, yogurt, etc. can furnish microbial protein during a daily diet of the people. Mass cultivated microbial biomass has been used as a source of nutrition for humans and domestic animals. For example, in 1910 brewer’s yeast was used in Germany as a feeding supplement for animals and in Japan, several processes for algae food cultivation are in operation today. After World War II some countries, namely England, the United States, Germany, etc., have been interested in producing microbial biomass for animals and the term, single-cell protein (SCP) has been accepted.

Keywords

Microbial Biomass Specific Growth Rate Anaerobic Digestion Immobilize Enzyme Cellulosic Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Pekin
    • 1
  1. 1.Ege UniversityBornova IzmirTurkey

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