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A Computerized Acoustic Imaging Technique Incorporating Automatic Object Recognition

  • J. P. Powers
  • D. E. Mueller

Abstract

A computerized technique combining backward wave propagation and an automatic edge detection scheme has been developed and tested. The class of objects considered is limited to those with edge boundaries since it can be shown that a universal automatic reconstruction scheme cannot be obtained for all possible objects. Using samples of the acoustic diffraction pattern as input data, this technique enables the computer to predict the most likely locations of objects and to produce graphical output of the objects. A simplified edge detection scheme conserving both memory space and computer time was used. Test results are presented for both computer generated diffraction patterns and one set of experimental data.

Keywords

Edge Detection Real Image Object Location Evanescent Wave Fast Fourier Trans 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Powers
    • 1
  • D. E. Mueller
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringNaval Postgraduate SchoolMontereyUSA
  2. 2.Federal German NavyGermany

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