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Bragg-Diffraction Imaging: A Potential Technique for Medical Diagnosis and Material Inspection, Part II

  • Hormozdyar Keyani
  • John Landry
  • Glen Wade

Abstract

In terms of image degradation, one of the most serious problems encountered in low-frequency Bragg-diffraction imaging is caused by multiple acoustic reflections within the Bragg cell. The effect of these reflections can be reduced by frequency sweeping or by using properly-located acoustic absorbers. This paper discusses experiments in this regard and describes several different types of absorbers for a 3.58 MHz system.

Another source of substantial difficulty at the low frequencies is spherical aberration in the cylindrical converging lens used to form the laser beam. The design of such a lens and its effect on the system resolution are discussed.

Keywords

Spherical Aberration Test Grid Polyethylene Membrane Lucite Plate Acoustical Holography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    John Landry, Hormozdyar Keyani, and Glen Wade, “Bragg-Diffraction Imaging: A Potential Technique for Medical Diagnosis and Material Inspection,” Acoustical Holography, Vol. IV, ED. Glen Wade, Plenum Press, 1972.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Soo-Chang Pei, “Elimination of Bragg Image Speckle by Frequency Modulation,” August 1972, unpublished.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hormozdyar Keyani
    • 1
  • John Landry
    • 1
  • Glen Wade
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA

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