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Applications and General Conclusions

  • C. F. Quate

Abstract

The work presented in this series of lectures covers a spectrum of ideas and techniques that are part of a technology for imaging — a technology that has been expanding and growing over the past several years. It was only a short while ago that ultrasonic imaging was confined to a few institutions and the instrumentation consisted of variations of the system made up of a sound beam in the form of a pencil-like probe that was scanned either by hand or with the aid of mechanical levers. Many images were recorded from a storage tube with two levels of brightness — black and white. Research workers and clinicians have developed a great skill in the use of these instruments and a vast amount of information has been recorded by a careful, systematic exploration and correlation with known features. One prime example of the technique has been described by Dr. F. Weill1 and his co-authors in Besancon, France.

Keywords

Ultrasonic Imaging Acoustic Image Clinical Ultrasound Sound Beam Edge Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. F. Quate
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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