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The Hamster pp 229-259 | Cite as

Neural Basis of Reproductive Behavior

  • Charles W. Malsbury
  • Mario O. Miceli
  • Charles W. Scouten

Abstract

We believe that the study of the organization and function of the brain is the most fascinating scientific enterprise possible (molecular genetics notwithstanding). However, because of the complexity of the mammalian brain, in order to have any chance of success at this enterprise, one must pick one’s questions with great care. Why study the neural basis of reproductive behaviors?

Keywords

Maternal Behavior Medial Forebrain Bundle Stria Terminalis Main Olfactory Bulb Medial Preoptic Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles W. Malsbury
    • 1
  • Mario O. Miceli
    • 1
  • Charles W. Scouten
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMemorial University of NewfoundlandSt. John’s NewfoundlandCanada

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