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Abstract

Communication in the squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus has been the subject of numerous analyses over the past two decades. One of the interesting aspects of having participated in some of these studies has been the realization that, even in this well-studied species, there are significant gaps in understanding the functional significance, ontogeny, and intraspecific variability of many common communication patterns. The causal mechanisms and evolutionary history of Saimiri communication are also areas of study for which there is a wealth of opportunity for further investigation.

Keywords

Squirrel Monkey Mating Season Call Type Discriminant Score Vocal Repertoire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Newman
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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