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Behavioral Pharmacology of the Squirrel Monkey

  • James E. Barrett

Abstract

Experiments on the effects of drugs on the behavior of the squirrel monkey have increased considerably in the 15 years since Hanson’s (1968) report on the use of this species in pharmacological experiments. More widespread usage of the squirrel monkey in both behavioral and pharmacological studies has generated a sizable amount of information. The primary emphasis of this chapter will be on summarizing characteristic behavior and drug effects under operant conditioning procedures. However, the effects of drugs on the social behavior of the squirrel monkey, as well as species comparisons of the behavioral effects of drugs, will also be treated briefly. Detailed procedures for handling squirrel monkeys and for administering drugs will not be covered, since earlier treatments of this material (Hanson, 1968; Kelleher et al., 1963) remain valid.

Keywords

Behavioral Effect Antipsychotic Drug Electric Shock Squirrel Monkey Noxious Stimulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Barrett
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, School of MedicineBethesdaUSA

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