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Education of Exceptional Persons

  • Bruce Dennis Sales
  • D. Matthew Powell
  • Richard Van Duizend

Abstract

Dramatic progress in establishing the right to appropriate education programs for exceptional children — those who are handicapped, as well as gifted or talented — has been accomplished in the past decade.1 Although states have legislated on behalf of exceptional persons for the last one hundred and fifty years, state laws in the previous century focused on the establishment of state schools and institutions. Since 1960 state legislative attention to special education has considerably increased in comprehensiveness. Yet, until the very recent past, many children with special education needs still have been either under-served or ignored, misclassified, or excluded entirely from school. For example, some laws for years barred from an education those deemed “uneducable” by school officials who, for reasons of administrative convenience, ignorance or lack of funds, chose not to deal with special education students.

Keywords

Special Education School District Related Service Education Regulation Placement Procedure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    20 U.S.C. §1413(a)(12) (1976).Google Scholar
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    Model act section 3(5)(e).Google Scholar
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  166. 16a.
    Josephine Barresi of the Policy Research Center, Council for Exceptional Children and Steven S. Goldberg of the Education Law Center had primary responsibility for developing this model statute. We also appreciate the advice and assistance of Scottie Torres Higgens and Fredrick J. Weintraub of the Council for Exceptional Children, and H. Rutherford Turnbull, III of the Institute of Government, University of North Carolina.Google Scholar
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    20 U.S.C. §1412(2)(B) (1976); 45 C.F.R. §121a.300 (1978).Google Scholar
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    20 U.S.C. §1401(17) (1976); 45 C.F.R. §121a.13 (1978); cf. services required pursuant to Developmentally Disabled Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, 42 U.S.C. §§6001–6081 (1976).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce Dennis Sales
    • 1
  • D. Matthew Powell
    • 1
  • Richard Van Duizend
    • 1
  1. 1.Developmental Disabilities State Legislative Project of the American Bar Association’sCommission on the Mentally DisabledUSA

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