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Defective RNAs of Alphaviruses

  • Sondra Schlesinger
  • Barbara G. Weiss
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

Most viruses, when passaged at high multiplicity in cultured cells, accumulate deletion mutants characterized by their ability to interfere with the replication of the standard virus. These mutants are defined as defective interfering (DI) particles (Huang and Baltimore, 1970; Perrault, 1981). One of their hallmarks is the specificity of their inhibition; they interfere only with the replication of homologous or closely related viruses. Why study DI particles? What can they tell us about the standard virus or about virus—host interactions? The following points attempt to answer these questions and provide the framework for this chapter.

Keywords

Persistent Infection Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Semliki Forest Virus Sindbis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sondra Schlesinger
    • 1
  • Barbara G. Weiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA

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