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Xanthines (Caffeine) and Nicotine

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

This chapter deals with the most culturally accepted legal drugs. As might be expected, these relatively mild (per usual dose) and highly attractive psychoactive substances have the widest use in our society. Despite the relatively benign effects that can be expected at low doses, the high prevalence of use results in frequent morbidity and (for tobacco) even a high level of mortality. These substances are discussed here because of the interaction between their use and various psychiatric disorders, as well as because of medical complaints that can be seen in emergency settings. The chapter first deals with the xanthines, including caffeine, and then goes on to a discussion of nicotine.

Keywords

Cigarette Smoking England Journal Withdrawal Symptom Panic Disorder Panic Attack 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.San Diego School of Medicine, Veterans Administration HospitalUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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