Advertisement

H-2 Antigens pp 435-440 | Cite as

I-J: An Inducible Isomorphic Receptor Involved in the H-2-Restricted Cell Interaction and Inhibition

  • Tomio Tada
  • Yoshihiro Asano
  • Toshinori Nakayama
  • Isao Fujisawa
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 144)

Abstract

I-J still remains to be a premium grade paradox in H-2 genetics. Although it is not a direct product of H-2 genes, its polymorphism is clearly influenced by the intra H-2 genes. Recent functional data suggested that I-J is associated with the inducible T cells receptor for self class II antigens (1,2). It has been found that some of the anti-I-J monoclonal antibodies (mAb) could block the syngeneic and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) by reacting with the responder but not with stimulator cells (1). The I-J epitopes on responder cells were inducible in allogeneic bone marrow chimeras (2). Since some of the anti-I-J mAb were able to inhibit the H-2-restricted T helper cell (Th) function, we have recently tested their effect on Th and T cell clones derived from various intra H-2 recombinant mice and their bone marrow chimeras (3). The following are the summary of experimental results which suggest that I-J is an inducible isomorphic marker different from both class II products and conventional class II restricted T cell receptors.

Keywords

Cell Clone Restriction Specificity Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction Chimeric Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference

  1. 1.
    W. Uracz, R. Abe, and T. Tada, Involvement of I-J epitopes in the self-and allo-recognition sites of T cells: blocking of syngenic and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction-responder cells by monoclonal anti-I-J antibodies. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:2905 (1985).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. Uracz, Y. Asano, R. Abe, and T. Tada, I-J epitopes are adaptively acquired by T cells differentiated in the chimeric condition. Nature 316: 741 (1985).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Y. Asano, T. Nakayama, M. Kubo, J. Yagi, and T. Tada, Epitopes associated with MHC restriction site of T cells. III. I-J epitope on MHC-restricted T helper cells. (submitted).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    D.B. Murphy, L.A. Herzenberg, K. Okumura, L.A. Herzenberg, and H.O. McDevitt, A new I subregion (I-J) marked by a locus (Ia-4) controlling surface determinants on suppressor T lymphocytes. J. Exp. Med. 144:699 (1976).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    T. Tada, M. Taniguchi, and C.S. David, Properties of the antigen-specific suppressive T-cell factor in the regulation of antibody responses in the mouse. IV. Special subregion assignment of the gene(s) that codes for the suppressive T cell factor in the H-2 histocompatibility complex. J. Exp. Med. 144:713 (1976).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    H. Kawasaki, K. Zupko, B. Diamond, M. Minami, and M.E. Dorf, Antibody inhibition of suppressor cell induction. J. Immunol. 138: 2063 (1987).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomio Tada
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Asano
    • 1
  • Toshinori Nakayama
    • 1
  • Isao Fujisawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyFaculty of Medicine University of TokyoTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations