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Guanidines pp 59-69 | Cite as

Developmental Changes of Guanidino Compounds in Chick Embryo

  • Yoko Watanabe
  • Takashi Kadoya
  • Masayoshi Fukui
  • Rei Edamatsu
  • Akitane Mori
  • Sonoko Seki

Abstract

It is well known that many kinds of guanidino compounds are observed in invertebrates and vertebrates1,2. The appearance of guanidino compounds in animals is thought to be related to nitrogen metabolism but there are no reports concerning guanidino compounds and embryogenesis. The present study was undertaken to learn about the appearance and changes in concentrations of guanidino compounds in the whole chick embryo, yolk and embryonic organs at various stages of embryonic development. It is hoped that this study might contribute to our basic understanding of guanidino compound metabolism during embryogenesis.

Keywords

Chick Embryo Embryonic Liver Guanidino Compound Embryonic Organ HArg Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoko Watanabe
    • 1
  • Takashi Kadoya
    • 1
  • Masayoshi Fukui
    • 1
  • Rei Edamatsu
    • 1
  • Akitane Mori
    • 1
  • Sonoko Seki
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurochemistry, Institute for NeurobiologyOkayama University Medical SchoolOkayama 700Japan
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyKanagawa Dental CollegeInaokacho, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 238Japan

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