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Guanidines pp 309-316 | Cite as

Guanidinoacetic Acid (GAA) in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure (CRF) and Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

  • Y. Tsubakihara
  • N. Iida
  • S. Yuasa
  • T. Kawashima
  • I. Nakanishi
  • M. Tomobuchi
  • T. Yokogawa

Abstract

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the precursor of creatine, an essential element in the energy metabolism of musle and nerve tissue1. GAA itself may have some physiological role such as the stimulation of insulin secretion2. As shown in Fig. 1, GAA is mainly produced in the kidney by the transamidination of glycine from arginine.

Keywords

Chronic Renal Failure Diabetes Mellitus Patient Chronic Glomerulonephritis High Performance Liquid Chro Guanidine Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Tsubakihara
    • 1
  • N. Iida
    • 1
  • S. Yuasa
    • 1
  • T. Kawashima
    • 1
  • I. Nakanishi
    • 1
  • M. Tomobuchi
    • 1
  • T. Yokogawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Kidney Disease CenterOsaka Prefectural HospitalSumiyoshi-ku, OsakaJapan

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