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Antifouling Polymers: Room-Temperature-Curing Organotin Polymers

  • R. V. Subramanian
  • K. N. Somasekharan

Abstract

We have reported extensively on antifouling formulations in which tributyltin carboxylate groups are chemically anchored to the polymer chain.1–3 In these controlled-release formulations, the prepolymers were prepared by partial esterification by bis(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) of linear polymers carrying carboxylic acid or anhydride groups. The free carboxylic acid or anhydride groups were than reacted with diepoxides to form thermoset organotin-epoxy polymers. Many variations of this scheme were investigated, including one which provided for simultaneous vinyl polymerization and carboxyl-epoxide reactions. Curing was accomplished at high temperatures (about 150°C) in all these reactions.

Keywords

Unsaturated Polyester Epoxy System Anhydride Group Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide Free Carboxylic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. V. Subramanian
    • 1
  • K. N. Somasekharan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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