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Conditioning pp 677-695 | Cite as

Classical Conditioning in Aplysia: Neuronal Circuits Involved in Associative Learning

  • E. T. Walters
  • T. J. Carew
  • R. D. Hawkins
  • E. R. Kandel
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 26)

Summary

Recent analyses of the neural control of learning and memory suggest that one needs to identify and examine the neuronal circuitry specific to the behavior that is modified by the learning in order to study the cellular mechanisms underlying these processes. In this paper we describe an example of a simple form of classical conditioning in the gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica. This example of associative learning offers considerable promise for a cellular analysis because it involves relatively simple and well-analyzed neuronal circuits. Knowledge of the neuronal circuits involved in the conditioning pathways is reviewed, and a preliminary hypothesis for the mechanisms of this form of classical conditioning is considered.

Keywords

Motor Neuron Conditioned Stimulus Sensory Neuron Unconditioned Stimulus Classical Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. T. Walters
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. J. Carew
    • 1
  • R. D. Hawkins
    • 1
  • E. R. Kandel
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Neurobiology and Behavior College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia University New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology School of MedicineUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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