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Biochemical Basis for Dose Response Relationships in Reactive Metabolite Toxicity

  • David J. Jollow
  • Stanley Roberts
  • Veronica Price
  • Carol Smith
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

The majority of pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs and other xenobiotics are believed to result from a reversible combination of the compounds with tissue receptors; the extent and duration of the effects being proportional to the concentration-time profile of the compound in the target tissue. If, as is often the case, there is a rapid equilibrium between compound in tissues and in plasma, determination of the plasma concentrations of the compound can be used as an indirect measure of the compound in the target tissue. The pharmacokinetic equations developed to relate plasma concentrations to total body load and elimination in this situation and thus to predict the severity and duration of the biological effects are well known.

Keywords

Reactive Metabolite Liver Necrosis Mercapturic Acid Piperonyl Butoxide Toxic Pathway 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Jollow
    • 1
  • Stanley Roberts
    • 1
  • Veronica Price
    • 1
  • Carol Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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