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Metabolism of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene by Rat Hepatic Microsomes and Cecal Flora

  • John G. Dent
  • Stephanie R. Schnell
  • Derek Guest
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

Dinitrotoluene (DNT) is an industrial chemical used as an intermediate in the production of toluene diisocyanate for the manufacture of polyurethane foams, coatings and elastomers. Technical grade DNT is a potent hepatocarcinogen which produces a dose related incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in Fischer 344 rats (CIIT, 1979). The technical grade material comprises approximately 75% 2,4-DNT, 19.5% 2,6-DNT and 4% other DNT isomers with small amounts of mono-and tri-nitrotoluenes and nitrocresols also present. The major component of the technical grade material, 2,4-DNT, has also been demonstrated to be a hepatocarcinogen in CD-1 rats (Ellis et al., 1979).

Keywords

Hepatic Microsome Anaerobic Incubation Mixed Function Oxidase Cecal Content Nitro Toluene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Dent
    • 1
  • Stephanie R. Schnell
    • 1
  • Derek Guest
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Industry Institute of ToxicologyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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