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A Review of Experimental Measurement Methods Based on Gas-Phase Chemiluminescence

  • Arthur Fontijn
  • Dan Golomb
  • Jimmie A. Hodgeson

Abstract

The first application of gas-phase chemiluminescence could have been the contribution to the illumination of a cave by the blue portion of a wood flame. Qualitative flame analysis has been in use since at least the 16th Century.1 For many present-day applications, observation of chemiluminescence has the advantages that (i) measurement of such radiation in no way interferes with the reacting environment, (ii) the measuring tool does not have to be exposed directly to the active reaction environment, i.e. remote sensing is possible, (iii) transient species can be readily identified and (iv) in its most elementary form the observer’s eye is the only tool required. For these reasons chemiluminescence measurements represent an obvious and often immediately available method for investigating a given medium. When coupled with modern reliable sensitive detection methods, which cover the optical spectrum from the vacuum ultraviolet through the near infrared, chemiluminescence provides a major tool for species concentration measurements.

Keywords

Shock Tube Flow Tube Combustion Institute CHEMI Luminescence Collisional Excitation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur Fontijn
    • 1
  • Dan Golomb
    • 2
  • Jimmie A. Hodgeson
    • 3
  1. 1.AeroChem Research LaboratoriesInc.PrincetonUSA
  2. 2.Air Force Cambridge Research LaboratoriesL.G. Hanscom FieldBedfordUSA
  3. 3.Environmental Protection AgencyTechnical CenterResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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