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Transvibronic Reactions in Molecular Beams

  • D. R. Herschbach

Abstract

Collisional processes involving interconversion of translational, vibrational, and electronic energy are referred to as “transvibronic reactions,” in analogy to spectroscopic nomenclature. Many such processes can now be studied in molecular beams, thanks to methods for generating collision energies in the previously almost inaccessible hyperthermal range (a few tenths to a few tens of eV) and methods for producing beams of vibrationally excited molecules. The single-collision conditions obtained in beam experiments can be exploited to isolate and identify elementary steps in a chemical mechanism and to determine dynamical properties. These include the dependence of the rate on collision energy and vibrational excitation of the reactants, the distribution in translational and vibrational energy and scattering angle of the products, and further details related to the electronic coupling of the collision partners.

Keywords

Collision Energy Electronic Excitation Vibrational Excitation Translational Energy Alkali Atom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. R. Herschbach
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryHarvard UniversityUSA

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